Xochiquetzal

Ricardo Pozzo


Reblogged from oursoulsaredamned
oursoulsaredamned:

by Manuel Orazi

oursoulsaredamned:

by Manuel Orazi

(via demoniality)

Reblogged from arsvitaest
arsvitaest:

Nymphs and Satyr
Author: William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825–1905) Date: 1873Medium: Oil on canvas Location: Clark Art Institute (currently on display at the Met)
According to the Clark Institute, in the painting “a group of nymphs have been surprised, while bathing in a secluded pond, by a lascivious satyr. Some of the nymphs have retreated into the shadows on the right; others, braver than their friends, are trying to dampen the satyr’s ardor by pulling him into the cold water—one of the satyr’s hooves is already wet and he clearly wants to go no further. Bouguereau’s working methods were traditional; he made a number of sketches and drawings of carefully posed human figures in complicated interconnected poses, linking them together in this wonderfully rhythmical composition.”

arsvitaest:

Nymphs and Satyr

Author: William-Adolphe Bouguereau (French, 1825–1905)
Date: 1873

Medium: Oil on canvas
Location: Clark Art Institute (
currently on display at the Met)

According to the Clark Institute, in the painting “a group of nymphs have been surprised, while bathing in a secluded pond, by a lascivious satyr. Some of the nymphs have retreated into the shadows on the right; others, braver than their friends, are trying to dampen the satyr’s ardor by pulling him into the cold waterone of the satyr’s hooves is already wet and he clearly wants to go no further. Bouguereau’s working methods were traditional; he made a number of sketches and drawings of carefully posed human figures in complicated interconnected poses, linking them together in this wonderfully rhythmical composition.”

Reblogged from nevver
nevver:

“Anything worth dying for… is certainly worth living for.”  — Joseph Heller, Catch-22

nevver:

“Anything worth dying for… is certainly worth living for.”
— Joseph Heller, Catch-22

Reblogged from thegorean

sterlingrose81:

goreanmaster:

thegorean:

A few beautiful submissive poses photographed by the great artist mjranum

http://mjranum.deviantart.com

.

Xoxo

(via darkness664)

Reblogged from voxiferaldiana
voxiferaldiana:

Gerald B. Gardner with the Magic Sword at the Museum of Witchcraft 

voxiferaldiana:

Gerald B. Gardner with the Magic Sword at the Museum of Witchcraft 

(via demoniality)

Reblogged from amusetogazeupon
joakimaskinisten:

Le Vaisseau du Grand Oeuvre
1910
Julien Champagne’s most famous painting, Le Vaisseau du Grand Oeuvre (Vessel of the Great Work), was completed in the year 1910. The painting was a great favorite among the Parisian occultists during the first third of the 20th Century. The voluptuous model for the painting was purported to be the young female alchemist, Louise Barbe (ca. 1879-1919); she was the wife of the infamous Russian “monkey gland” surgeon, Serge Voronoff (1866-1951). Louise was a member of the occult circle which gathered at the salon of the de Lesseps family (children of the great Ferdinand de Lesseps) in Paris. Of course, the “Great Work” is Alchemy, and the painting is filled with alchemical symbolism. The nude female figure is a personification of the philosopher’s stone; she stands within a glass flask and is surrounded by myriad blazing flames. Off the right shoulder of the young woman is the word “POTERE” meaning “power” in English; off of her left shoulder is the word “AVDERE” meaning “to dare” in English. The background on the left and right sides of the flask contain the names of certain philosophers and alchemists written in Latin letters. The names on the left side are as follows: Artephius, Albert le Grand, Synesius, Th. d’Aquin, R. Lulle, Flamel, Rhazes, and Geber. The names on the right side are as follows: Roger Bacon, A. de Villeneuve, Basile Valentin, Van Helmont, Paracelse, Philalethe, Trevisan, and Ripley. In the darkened sky behind the female figure are depictions of the Moon and four planets that are visible to the naked eye: above her right shoulder are Saturn and Jupiter; on her lower right side is a crescent Venus (Morning Star); above her left shoulder is a crescent Moon; and to her lower left is the planet Mars. On her forehead the woman wears a sparkling diamond of the Queen of Heaven, Isis, the Goddess of magic and the occult arts. The diamond represents the “Great Eye,” which Isis is purported to have stolen from Ra, the supreme God of Pharaonic Egypt. Eugène Canseliet used a representation of this painting as the frontispiece in the 1979 reprint of his book entitled Deux logis alchimiques, en marge de la science et de l’histoire (originally published in 1945).

joakimaskinisten:

Le Vaisseau du Grand Oeuvre

1910

Julien Champagne’s most famous painting, Le Vaisseau du Grand Oeuvre (Vessel of the Great Work), was completed in the year 1910. The painting was a great favorite among the Parisian occultists during the first third of the 20th Century. The voluptuous model for the painting was purported to be the young female alchemist, Louise Barbe (ca. 1879-1919); she was the wife of the infamous Russian “monkey gland” surgeon, Serge Voronoff (1866-1951). Louise was a member of the occult circle which gathered at the salon of the de Lesseps family (children of the great Ferdinand de Lesseps) in Paris. Of course, the “Great Work” is Alchemy, and the painting is filled with alchemical symbolism. The nude female figure is a personification of the philosopher’s stone; she stands within a glass flask and is surrounded by myriad blazing flames. Off the right shoulder of the young woman is the word “POTERE” meaning “power” in English; off of her left shoulder is the word “AVDERE” meaning “to dare” in English. The background on the left and right sides of the flask contain the names of certain philosophers and alchemists written in Latin letters. The names on the left side are as follows: Artephius, Albert le Grand, Synesius, Th. d’Aquin, R. Lulle, Flamel, Rhazes, and Geber. The names on the right side are as follows: Roger Bacon, A. de Villeneuve, Basile Valentin, Van Helmont, Paracelse, Philalethe, Trevisan, and Ripley. In the darkened sky behind the female figure are depictions of the Moon and four planets that are visible to the naked eye: above her right shoulder are Saturn and Jupiter; on her lower right side is a crescent Venus (Morning Star); above her left shoulder is a crescent Moon; and to her lower left is the planet Mars. On her forehead the woman wears a sparkling diamond of the Queen of Heaven, Isis, the Goddess of magic and the occult arts. The diamond represents the “Great Eye,” which Isis is purported to have stolen from Ra, the supreme God of Pharaonic Egypt. Eugène Canseliet used a representation of this painting as the frontispiece in the 1979 reprint of his book entitled Deux logis alchimiques, en marge de la science et de l’histoire (originally published in 1945).

(Source: amusetogazeupon, via demoniality)

Reblogged from uromancy
uromancy:

Nikolai Kalmakov. Chapelle Fortin - Warrior.

uromancy:

Nikolai Kalmakov. Chapelle Fortin - Warrior.

(via demoniality)

Reblogged from uromancy
uromancy:

Nikolai Kalmakov Chapelle Fortin: Monster With Sword.

uromancy:

Nikolai Kalmakov Chapelle Fortin: Monster With Sword.

(via demoniality)

Reblogged from gazophylacium
gazophylacium:

Dionysos and Agathos Daimon (“Good Spirit”), genius of the soil around Vesuvius, Pompeii.

gazophylacium:

Dionysos and Agathos Daimon (“Good Spirit”), genius of the soil around Vesuvius, Pompeii.

(via demoniality)

Reblogged from arsvitaest
arsvitaest:

Dance of satyrs and nymphs in spring landscape
by Max Pietschmann (German, 1865-1952)

arsvitaest:

Dance of satyrs and nymphs in spring landscape

by Max Pietschmann (German, 1865-1952)

Reblogged from arsvitaest
arsvitaest:

A Hamadryad
Author: John William Waterhouse (English, 1849–1917) Date: 1893Medium: Oil on canvasLocation: Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery, Plymouth, Devon, UK
In Greek mythology, a dryad is a tree nymph, or female tree spirit. In Greek drys signifies “oak.” Thus, dryads are specifically the nymphs of oak trees, though the term has come to be used for all tree nymphs in general.
Dryads, like all nymphs, were supernaturally long-lived and tied to their homes, but some were a step beyond most nymphs. These were the hamadryads who were an integral part of their trees, such that if the tree died, the hamadryad associated with it died as well.

arsvitaest:

A Hamadryad

Author: John William Waterhouse (English, 18491917)
Date: 1893
Medium: Oil on canvas
Location:
Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery, Plymouth, Devon, UK

In Greek mythology, a dryad is a tree nymph, or female tree spirit. In Greek drys signifies “oak.” Thus, dryads are specifically the nymphs of oak trees, though the term has come to be used for all tree nymphs in general.

Dryads, like all nymphs, were supernaturally long-lived and tied to their homes, but some were a step beyond most nymphs. These were the hamadryads who were an integral part of their trees, such that if the tree died, the hamadryad associated with it died as well.

Reblogged from d-a-l-t-o-n-i-s-m-o
Reblogged from centuriespast
centuriespast:

Star MandalaJapanese
Philadelphia Museum of Art

centuriespast:

Star Mandala
Japanese

Philadelphia Museum of Art

Reblogged from mortem-et-necromantia
Reblogged from blitzkriegwitchcraft
blitzkriegwitchcraft:

The Witches’ Kitchen - Francisco Goya

blitzkriegwitchcraft:

The Witches’ Kitchen - Francisco Goya

(via demoniality)